In Diversity Gap at Michigan Flagship, 
Signs of a Lost Public Mission

Wednesday, March 5, 2014 (All day)

In Diversity Gap at Michigan Flagship, 
Signs of a Lost Public Mission

From the earliest teach-ins against the Vietnam War to demonstrations for black-studies programs, the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor has historically served as a bellwether of campus movements to democratize our society. Recent student protests against racism and a hostile campus climate have again placed Michigan at the center of debates about the waning of student diversity at the country’s elite public universities.

Indeed, the trend at Michigan is hardly encouraging. Black undergraduate enrollment peaked at 9.2 percent in 1996-97. It declined to 7 percent by 2006 and dropped to 4.7 percent in 2013. Despite the growth of the Latino population locally and nationally, Latino undergraduate enrollment peaked at 5 percent in 2003 and 2005 and has since fallen to 4.4 percent. Native-American enrollment plateaued at 1 percent from 2004 to 2007 before plummeting to 0.2 percent from 2010 to 2013.

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